Monthly Archives: September 2017

What To Know Before Buying an Elliptical For Your Home

So here are 5 features you need to examine when buying your elliptical machine:

#1 Stride Length

Stride is the basically the furthest distance between the elliptical pedals. Most stride lengths vary from 14 inches up to 22 inches.

The right stride length will help to more fully work your lower body muscles and give you a more natural feeling ride. A stride that is too short will feel unnatural – almost jumpy – when you pick up the pace.

What’s the proper stride length? That depends on you really. However most people of average height find a stride of 18 to 20 inches to be the most comfortable for them.

Taller people over 6 feet will definitely want to go for a 20 to 22 inch stride.

Some elliptical trainers even offer you adjustable strides. These trainers are great for multiple user households as everyone can choose the perfect stride for them.

Watch out for cheaper elliptical trainers that only give you from 14 – 17 inch strides as most people find these to be too short – and uncomfortable in the long run.

#2 Flywheel

While some manufacturers do not list the weight of the flywheel, many manufacturers are starting to do this on their websites and sales flyers these days.

In general the heavier the flywheel, the smoother feeling the elliptical ride. You’ll find transitioning between resistance levels much easier with a heavier flywheel.

Flywheels vary from 8 pounds up to 48 pounds so you have a wide variety here.

Usually the higher end ellipticals carry the heavier flywheels.A heavier flywheel also helps to anchor the machine for added stability.

#3 Design

There are 2 basic elliptical machine designs these days. The front drive elliptical has the flywheel placed in front of the pedals under the console and moving arm bars.

The rear-drive elliptical places the flywheel behind the foot pedals.

Which design is best?

This is largely a personal preference thing. Some people find that a front drive design gives them more of a climbing elliptical path (which can be great for burning calories).

Whereas the rear drive design gives more of a flatter elliptical path (which is more like a natural running motion). So in the end it comes down to which you prefer.

#4 Console

Consoles are all over the board these days. However there are several features that are always a hit with buyers.

First of all, try to look for a backlit console – as it’s easier to see your workout stats.

Also look for larger console windows which, again, make it easier to read your stats.

Cheaper ellipticals will toggle back and forth between your stats and many people don’t like this – they want to see a constant reading of their calories, time, etc.

Another thing that some manufacturers are adding to consoles are built-in fans to help keep you cool. This is a small thing, but you may find it very convenient during long, hot workouts.

Combine Services and Software to Achieve Superior Bacterial

Leveraging recent developments and reliable third-party services, it is now possible to combine outside services with internal software to achieve superior bacterial comparative analysis results in record time. The key is understanding how to combine the services and software for the fastest and most accurate results.

The first step is understanding what types of services are offered for metagenomics, genomics, and transcriptomics and how they can be utilized. The goal of metagenomics is to characterize what species are present in any given environment can understand their complex interactions. Microbial communities range from very simple to extremely complex and are very diverse across a wide range of habitats. NGS or next-generation sequencing has provided researchers with unprecedented views of microbial diversity. A shotgun metagenomics service is particularly useful because it randomly sequences DNA fragments from sample environments which allows researchers to evaluate the microbial diversity and detect species abundance without the individual assembly of microbial genomes.

Genomics relies on whole genome sequencing to generate the most comprehensive data sets available when evaluating genetic features of an individual organism. It is increasingly common for bacterial comparative analysis to rely on whole genome sequencing to conduct outbreak analysis and the study of pathogenicity and antimicrobial resistance. Finally, transcriptomics has grown reliant on RNA sequencing as an accurate, sensitive, and cost-effective method to discover and profile mRNA transcripts as well as identified novel genes. To achieve this and end to end solution is the ideal option.

The second step is leveraging available software solutions to interpret, manage, and compare data. In the past, bacterial comparative analysis required researchers to either have a programming language expertise or patch together various Excel and text files. With today’s software, it is easier than ever for researchers to glean all the information they need and complete a bacterial comparative analysis via an easy-to-use software interface.

To get the best results from third-party services and in-house software is to select services and software which are inherently compatible. In fact, many of the best third-party services now deliver data through their own suite of point-and-click software solutions. This type of standalone tool gives researchers the power to directly visualize data, run bacterial comparative analysis, and perform secondary analysis. Not only does this save time but also gives researchers more flexibility and a greater data set to work from. For example, the best software solutions include potentially hundreds of thousands of samples in their reference databases.

Alternative Ellipticals To the Bowflex Max Trainer

But are there any alternatives to the Bowflex Max? Well, about a year ago, the answer was no – the Max was pretty unique and kudos to Bowflex for designing such a cool, fat-burning trainer.

But the good news is that now you have options. Other brands have seen the success of Bowflex and come out with their own options to build on the Max’s success. So here are 3 of your options with the benefits to each:

#1 Proform Cardio HIIT Trainer

The Proform Cardio HIIT Trainer is an elliptical that combines a 10 inch vertical stride with a 5 inch horizontal stride for a vertical climbing motion – very similar to what you get with the Max Trainer.

It also gives you upper body arms for whole body training and takes up half the space as a regular elliptical. Plus it comes with a few things you don’t get with the Bowflex trainer – like the option for iFit LIVE (which adds more workouts to your trainer including several HIIT workouts and lets you track your workouts over time).

You also get a built-in console fan to keep you cool and 24 levels of resistance (which is slightly more than the Max Elliptical).

#2 Proform Cardio HIIT Trainer Pro

This is a step up from the Cardio HIIT Trainer above, and my favorite option of all. It combines the same design of the Cardio HIIT Trainer – along with a full color console and built-in, touch screen web browser.

So you can surf the net as you workout, read the latest business news or watch YouTube videos for fun.

It gives you more levels of resistance than the HIIT trainer – so there’s more room to grow as well. There’s also a heavier flywheel for added stability.

Plus it’s actually a few hundred less than the premium Max Trainer model. So it’s a great value.

#3 Sole SC200 Stepper

This is another combo stepper-elliptical traner with upper body arm bars for a whole body workout.

It’s a bit simpler than the HIIT Trainer or the Bowflex Max with a scaled down console and a few less resistance levels than the HIIT trainer.

But it does come with several built-in workouts and a hand grip heart rate monitor to stay in your target fat-burning zone. You also get wheels on the bottom of the stepper to move it to anywhere in your home easily.

So those are 3 similar alternatives to the Bowflex Max Trainer. Each one has its own unique benefits.

Don’t forget however there are now 3 different Max Trainer models staring around $1100 and up – so chances are you may also find a Max Trainer that is right for you if you decide that’s what you want.

How Often Should You Be Changing Your Running Shoes?

Sounds simple enough right? When it comes to running shoes, though, you need to remember you need to get good quality shoes built for the type of activity you are doing. Plus you need to ensure you are changing your shoes often enough, so they are providing the cushioning and support you need.
How often should you be changing your running shoes? Let us go over a few things, so you are aware of the best time to switch to a new pair…

1. Your Running Mileage. The biggest factor determining your running shoe lifespan is how many miles you have traveled. Consider the average pair of running shoes should give you around 300 to 500 miles worth, this can give you a relatively good indication of how long you can go. If you are running an average of 20 miles a week, this should amount to around 15 to 25 week’s worth of usage.

Keeping track of your miles, both those run and walked, is important so you know when your time is up with that pair of running shoes. If you are doing most of these miles on the treadmill, your shoes may look brand new, but keep in mind the padding in them may be anything but new!

2. Your Body Weight. The next factor to think about is your body weight. Generally speaking, the heavier you are, the faster your shoes will wear out. There will be more stress coming down with each step you take, mostly wearing out the padding as you run.

If you are over 150 pounds, you might only get the 300-mile mark with your shoes, while if you are under 150 pounds, you may be closer to the 500-mile mark.

You will need to judge for yourself how your shoes are feeling as you run in them day after day. If you start noticing sore and achy joints, this is a good sign it may be time to change those shoes for a new pair.

3. Where Are You Running? Finally, think about where you are running. Are you running primarily in open areas or are you running in forests and off-road trails? If it is essentially flat ground running you are doing; you may get a little more life out of your shoes compared to if you are running on terrain not as even. The support and stabilization of your shoe will be tested more in those scenarios, thus leading to faster wear and tear.

Keep these points in mind as you go about your workout sessions. Having a good pair of running shoes is vital to your success, so it is essential you do not overlook this critical element.